William Blankenship
Docker: Owning the Stack

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This is the third post of a 3-part series on docker. This series was transformed from a talk I gave at an STL DevOps meetup.

Here we are going to dive into the implications of developers taking ownership of their stacks through docker, and the work I have been doing at NodeSource to help developers take ownership of their Node.js stacks. If you haven’t already, take a few minutes to skim through the previous article in this series which lays the groundwork for this topic.

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In my previous article, we introduced the concept of developers owning the stack. Now let’s follow that rabbit hole down into the work I’ve been doing at NodeSource. When developers take ownership of their stack, they are no longer simply running Node 0.10.34, they are dep

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How Docker Changes Things

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This is the second post of a 3-part series on docker. This series was transformed from a talk I gave at an STL DevOps meetup.

We are going to talk about “owning the stack” via docker, and what that means to us as developers. If this post is successful, you will understand the full meaning and depth of that statement by the time you are done reading this. For a quick primer on what docker is, and why it is fantastic, check out the precursor to this blog post here.

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Often, when we hear people talk about docker [being](http://www.zdnet.com/article/what-is-docker-and-why-is-it-so-darn-p

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What Docker Is

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This is the first post of a 3-part series on docker. This series was transformed from a talk I gave at an STL DevOps meetup.

Let’s take a moment, really quick, to bring everyone up to speed on what docker is. If you already understand what docker is — and why it is so great — feel free to skip ahead to the next article.

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Docker started as an api on top of Linux Containers. It has grown to be a tool set and ecosystem for packaging and distributing applications. It’s api is built to be pluggable allowing the underlying technologies to be exchanged without any apparent changes to the end user.

Docker uses the primitives collectively known as “Linux Containers” including Linux Control Groups, Namespaces, and [IPtables](h

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